Barry Newman ‎– Noon Tide - 1974 Canada Private Jazz Rock LP

In stock
SKU
19648
CA$46.95

Barry Newman ‎– Noon Tide

Label:
Studio 3 Production Ltd. ‎– RR166306
Format:
Vinyl, LP
Country:
Canada
Released:
1974
Genre:
Jazz, Rock, Funk / Soul
Style:
Jazz-Rock, Funk

Tracklist

A1 On A Lifeline 5:15
A2 Such A Sunny Day 6:29
A3 Juan De Fuca Funk 5:09


B1 Another "No-Party" 5:00
B2 Burnin' Wolf's Beef 8:45
B3 Our Code Has A Long Way To

 

( music emporium) " “Noontide"—a term used by German philospoher Neitzche with reference to the apocalypse. In this case, it refers to an offbeat album from 1974 which combines rock with swing jazz, long before such moves were fashionable, and in a manner vastly different from the 1990’s take on swing. The record was written and recorded by Vancouver iconoclast legend Barry Newman (founder and publisher of Cosmic Debris Musicians Magazine). Newman, who had previously performed in Victoria-based bands Pastime, As Sheriff and Buckeye, played electric and 12-string acoustic guitar, and sang lead vocals on most of the LP. “Noontide” was recorded at Studio One, Vancouver, BC, in August, 1974. The four members of the band, aged 18 to 21, packed a rented car with as much gear as they could squeeze in, took the ferry to Vancouver, and recorded the album in five days. Some of the studio's commercial accounts (large department stores) kept interrupting the band’s allotted daily sessions So, by late Friday afternoon, out of the 40 full hours available to them to produce the album, only 17 hours had gone into recording... leaving 90 whole minutes to mix the entire album. Considering the quadruple multi-tracking of Dave Richardson's sax (at times sounding like a blend of Glen Miller & Blodwyn Pig), this was quite a feat! The “Noontide” album received some airplay in Canada in 1975, and in Belgium in 2001. In the mid-80's, Newman received a call from BMI (now SOCAN) explaining that a song called ‘On A Lifeline...’ by a "Barry Newman" was used as the soundtrack theme for an Australian movie. They said that the title of the movie was "It Could Be You" (!) Maybe it could have been Newman... but he never heard anything more about it. Barry continued driving taxi and playing in various bands on Vancouver Island until his untimely death in 2004."



This jazz / rock LP was written and recorded by Barry Newman (publisher, Cosmic Debris Musicians Magazine) at Studio One, Vancouver, BC, in August, 1974. It is one of the province's first "indie" recordings. Newman, who had previously performed in Victoria-based bands Pastime, As Sheriff and Buckeye, plays electric guitar, 12-string acoustic and sings most of the lead vocals on this vintage album.

The 4 members of Noontide, aged 18 to 21, packed a rented car with as much gear as they could squeeze in, and took the ferry to Vancouver to record the project in five days. During the evenings that week, Bryan Adams and John Booth were recording Sweeny Todd in the same studio.

Some of the studio's commercial accounts (large department stores) kept interrupting Noontide's allotted daily sessions to fix up their radio jingles, etc. So, by late Friday afternoon, instead of having 40 hours to produce the album, only 17 hours had gone into recording... leaving only 90 minutes left to mix the entire album. Considering the multi-tracking of Dave Richardson's sax (x4...at times sounding like a blend of Glenn Miller & Blodwyn Pig), this was quite a feat! Single songs often take over 100 hours to produce.

Newman was a complex, thoughtful being. He was a habitual writer/composer of poetry, prose, lyrics, essays & political comment. He left hundreds of smoky scrawled pages of his work dating back to the early 70's, to collate & catalogue.
It is a massive task. 
Barry's empathy with humanity was truly heartfelt & he was terribly affected by the ongoing strife in the world


BARRY NEWMAN - noon tide - loner/downer private canada west coast needledrop - 1974 pt1

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More Information
Condition Used
Format LP
Label Private Pressing
Color Black