The Doors - The Soft Parade - 70s Canada Issue - Classic Rock LP

In stock
SKU
10488
CA$34.95
The Doors - The Soft Parade

Label: Elektra (70s issue)
Catalog#: EKS-75005
Format: Vinyl, LP, Album, Gatefold
Vinyl: VG++, a few light scuffs
Gatefold cover: very light ringwear, corner wear
Country: Canada Issue
Released: Jul 1969
Genre: Rock
Style: Alternative Rock


Tracklist:

A1 Tell All The People 3:24
A2 Touch Me 3:15
A3 Shaman's Blues 4:45
A4 Do It 3:01
A5 Easy Ride 2:35


B1 Wild Child 2:36
B2 Runnin' Blue 2:27
Vocals - Robby Krieger
B3 Wishful Sinful 2:56
B4 The Soft Parade 8:40


Credits:
Arranged By [Orchestra] - Paul Harris
Bass - Doug Lubahn , Harvey Brooks
Congas - Reinol Andino
Engineer - Bruce Botnick
English Horn - Champ Webb
Fiddle - Jimmy Buchanan
Mandolin - Jesse McReynolds
Producer - Paul A. Rothchild
Saxophone - Curtis Amy
Trombone - George Bohanan


Notes:
Production Coordinator: Jac Holzman.
Recorded At Elektra Sound Recorders, Los Angeles.



This fourth album by The Doors, "The Soft Parade," is probably their most ambitious album. For this one they brought in a full orchestra to add strings and horns to their already definitive sound. The highlight of this one is the title cut, "The Soft Parade," a four-part offering that begins with an almost wistful feeling and escalates into blood-pumping, straight out rousing rock, played over Jim Morrison's cryptic and enigmatic lyrics (Catacombs/ nursery bones/ winter women growing stones/ carrying babies to the river). Also included is the poetic "Wishful Sinful," a song somehow benignly disturbing when you consider the darkness of the message that emerges from such a lilting melody: "Wishful, sinful/ wicked blue/ water covers you/ wishful, sinful/ wicked you/ can't escape the blue." There's a promise of freedom (but at a cost) in the anthem-like "Tell All The People (Can't you see me growing/ get your guns/ the time has come/ to follow me down)." The most well known cut from this album is "Touch Me," with lyrics by Robby Krieger and an interpretation by Morrison that is open to speculation. More equivocal lyrics accentuate "Shaman's Blues (Did you stop to consider/ how it will feel/ cold grinding grizzly bear jaws/ hot on your heels), during which another Morrison persona emerges, one apparently close to his heart and in being with his connection to the earth. A call to the youth of the world to step forward and take charge of their destiny is the subtle message of "Do It," while the eternal quest for freedom of mind and soul come to the fore in "Wild Child," which ends with the cryptic "You remember when we were in Africa?" which helps to fuel the myth that Morrison "pulled a Rimbaud" and actually disappeared into the Dark Continent in 1971. Rounding out "The Soft Parade" are "Easy Ride," and "Runnin' Blue." Listening now to this album from the distance of years, Morrison's insights and attitudes seem every bit as powerful now as they did then. When all is said and done, this was a guy who had a lot to say, and he is much more than the voice of a generation gone by; the songs here are further proof that The Doors were, and are, a force to be reckoned with, and their impact on society and a world diminishing in size and resources daily is still being felt. There are those who would dismiss rock n' roll out-of-hand, and it's time, perhaps, for them to listen to The Doors; for the words and music here can put a whole new spin on things. After all, it's all a matter of perspective. And great music, which is what this album provides.


The Doors - Touch Me

This song is great and beautifully done. Very classy.

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The Doors - Wild Child - Live

R.I.P. Jim Morrison you are the best idol in rock thank you for the great music!!

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The Doors - Wishful Sinful
Honestly, Jim wasn't always "cool" sometimes he got paranoid and whatnot and he could get really depressed. But he expressed himself through poetry (Note W. Blake's and A. Rimbaud's influence on his poetry and life).

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The Doors - Tell All The People
I can't believe people panned "The Soft Parade" album when it came out in the sixties. I think it showcases the Doors versatility.

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More Information
Condition Used
Format LP
Label Elektra
Artist Doors